Q&A: New CRCJ Chair Focuses on Research

July 2, 2015

crcj_kerley_500px

After a year of searching, the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice recently installed a new chair, Professor Kent Kerley. Kerley, an active scholar from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, sat down with College of Liberal Arts Communications Coordinator James Dunning to talk about his plans to raise the research profile of the department’s students and faculty.

Q: You’ve been a strong advocate of undergraduate student research at your previous institutions, UAB and Mississippi State University. What does UT Arlington offer in that area?

A: UTA offers the opportunity to take some of the things I learned at UAB and to apply them in a much larger setting. UTA has twice the number of criminal justice undergraduate students as UAB, and four times as many graduate students. We have many talented faculty members and a good infrastructure here for research excellence, but in the recent past the faculty members did not have adequate research mentoring. I bring the experience of working with faculty, students, and members of criminal justice agencies to publish in top journals (e.g., Aggression and Violent Behavior, Justice Quarterly, Social Forces, Social Problems) and to secure competitive funding from top federal agencies and corporations (e.g., National Science Foundation, Google). We also have a really solid student base and I think we can move quickly to a more research-oriented environment. UTA is a “high” research activity school, but our goal is to get to “very high.” I am very excited and thankful for this opportunity to serve.

Q: What has been your research path since completing your doctoral work at The University of Tennessee in 2001?

A: I started initially with policing issues and then gravitated towards corrections. Since 1999, I have done prison-based research, in particular studying faith-based prison programs and examining the impact and lived experience of various correctional treatment programs. Religion in prison is nothing new: the earliest prisons in the U.S. were designed by Quakers, and the model was solitary confinement, Bible study, and interaction with chaplains. That evolved over the years and then we hit a “silent period” in the 1960s and 1970s. Most prisons had chaplains, but there was little breadth or depth in programs. By the 1990s, we started to see greater interest in and expansion of faith-based programs. I was intrigued by this and wanted to find out which programs were working with inmates and how they perceived faith in the prison context. Most prisoners will tell you that they are changing for the good, but how are they changing? It is interesting to examine how prisoners live out faith, both privately and publicly.

Q: You’ve done several studies on this topic over the past decade. What is something the general public might not know?

A: I’ve had the opportunity to conduct research among male and female prison populations. One of my most surprising results is that, in general, men prefer to engage in the public practice of religion. They preferred to be in groups together, such as meetings with chaplains or local volunteers, large weekly services, and Bible studies with fellow inmates. The women, on the other hand, typically engaged in private practice and preferred to be by themselves or in very small groups with close friends. This challenges the stereotype that women are more social than men, especially in prison. Many of the women inmates said that the larger services had too many distractions and people who were not serious about their faith. The men, in our surveys and in-depth interviews, revealed how they were almost afraid of being alone and strongly desired group interaction to help them cope with being incarcerated.

Q: What do you think some of the challenges might be in your new role as chair?

A: I think our starting point is a greater focus on undergraduate research. We need to develop and retool some of our classes to introduce our students to the research process much sooner. That is our short-term goal. The long-term goal is to raise the research profile of the department. I want our students to be introduced right away to scholarly research articles, many written by our faculty, and to see firsthand how knowledge is created. When students come in and learn about research methods, such as how to pick topics and the people to be studied, and then read scholarly works they can connect the end result with the work needed to create it. Once they make that connection, they may have a greater interest in research. Not all of our students will go on to graduate school, but we will teach them the importance of data-driven analysis, thinking instead of feeling, problem solving, and technical writing. Almost all of our students will have jobs where those are necessary and valued skills. We want to train people to move into management-level positions in the criminal justice system and elsewhere. Inspiring our students to have a passion for research is the key.

Q: For the past several years, you’ve utilized undergraduate research through a summer program you created at UAB with more than $700,000 in grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Do you foresee doing something similar here at UTA?

A: Yes, it is something we want to do right away. Ultimately what happens is, if we have a greater emphasis on research in our classes, we start to interest students a bit more in research, and they are less intimidated by the research process. We then start to see students improving in classes like methods and statistics and we begin involving them in our research. They get a taste of research, which may encourage them to get involved in our new student organization (Society for Criminal Justice Students) and the department’s honor society (Alpha Phi Sigma). Then hopefully we have increased the likelihood that they will continue on here at UTA for graduate school.

This new emphasis on research benefits our faculty members as well. They will be encouraged to work more closely with students, to submit more articles and grant proposals with them, and to be part of a more collaborative environment. When I came on board, it did not seem that our faculty members received much encouragement to work with scholars in other departments and universities. My entire career has been built on interdisciplinary collaboration. I have worked with chemists, biologists, computer scientists, and scholars from nearly all of the social sciences. My hope is that here we can build an interdisciplinary research consortium.

Q: Law enforcement and court decisions top the nightly news. How can the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice respond to that?

A: We can offer a much more sophisticated understanding of criminal justice system, including police-community relations, the court systems, and the prison systems. Media members tend to focus on the most egregious or violent incidents, but those are not typical. The things that get the most attention are the things that happen the least. We want to create an environment where our students will be knowledgeable in how the system works.

Q: Apart from focusing on undergraduate research, what else do you hope to accomplish during your time as chair?

A: We have a great team here of faculty, staff, and students, and it is time to expand and to move up. We will be recruiting soon for more tenured and tenure-track faculty members. This is our time to build a strong and vibrant research-intensive environment. This is our time.

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Sociology, CMAS Professor Passes Away

July 1, 2015
Baker

Baker

Susan G. Baker, associate professor of sociology and former director of the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS), has passed away. Officials in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology were notified this week.

Baker joined UT Arlington in 2005 as Director of CMAS, remaining in the position until 2013. During her tenure, she created the Distinguished Lecture Series, which became the Center’s annual signature event. Baker earned her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, her master’s degree at the University of California at Berkeley and a bachelor’s degree in sociology and psychology at Trinity University.

“Dr. Baker was an outstanding scholar and passionate about the study of issues affecting Latinas in the U.S.,” said Associate Professor Christian Zlolniski (Anthropology), the current CMAS director. “During her tenure as director of CMAS, she was committed to her students, including several graduate students with whom she worked closely for years. She was also a very warm, loving, and kind-hearted person. Susan will be missed by her colleagues, students and staff at CMAS.”

Prior to working at UT Arlington, Baker had research and faculty positions at the Urban Institute, the University of Arizona and the University of Texas at Austin.

No memorial service is planned.

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SEED 2015 Students Create New Game

June 29, 2015

ICPF Partnership Benefits Visual Comm Students

June 19, 2015

The ongoing partnership between the Department of Art & Art History and the International Corrugated Packaging Foundation (ICPF) continues to benefit UT Arlington students.

In 2014, an ICPF grant led to creating the department’s Corrugated Prototype Design and CAD Production Lab and a student team won the Careers in Corrugated Packaging & Display Interactive Teleconference national competition. This summer, MFA candidate Shaban Al-Refai was named the first ICPF summer intern for UT Arlington.

Robert Hower, professor and department chair, said the relationship with ICPF has made a direct impact on the learning and future careers of students in the Visual Communication program.

“In the first year of the relationship, our students received first prize in a North American competition,” said Hower. “We have also placed numerous students in national internships and immediate employment opportunities upon graduation. We intend to expand our packaging offerings for incoming students and continue to produce highly qualified graduates to fulfill the needs of industry.”

Al-Refai’s internship is funded through ICPF’s corporate partnerships. Recently, Smurfit Kappa, Europe’s leading corrugated packaging company, pledged $150,000 to ICPF, and began working with the UTA intern at its Texas operations facility.

“The internship is a unique opportunity for Shaban to expand his knowledge of the packaging industry at the international level,” Hower said. “Clearly, this assists in broadening his career options internationally.”

To learn more about the program and the CorrPro lab, visit the department’s website.

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COMM Scholar Explores Knowledge Hoarding

June 16, 2015
Su

Su

In an age when open source platforms and over-sharing on social media is the norm, “knowledge hoarding” might seem anomalous. But Associate Professor Chunke Su (Communication) will spend the next three years with a $360,000 grant from the U.S. Army exploring the darker side of knowledge sharing.

“What triggered my research was a recent newspaper poll that said 76 percent of the 1,700 readers surveyed admitted to withholding knowledge from their co-workers,” said Su. “I found this interesting given how much we stress sharing knowledge and collaboration in today’s society.”

Utilizing transactive memory systems theory and social network analysis techniques, Su’s project will explore when and why employees hoard work-related knowledge from their co-workers in a variety of organizational work teams. Also, the research will “evaluate the outcomes of knowledge hoarding by studying the potential beneficial or harmful effects of knowledge hoarding on the performance of the work teams,” Su said.

READ MORE at uta.edu.

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New Book Examines Farm Life in Mexico

June 15, 2015
Zlolniski

Dr. Christian Zlolniski, Associate Professor of Anthropology

A new book co-written by a UT Arlington anthropologist examines U.S. consumer demand for fresh produce year-round and the impact of a robust agro-export business on workers in Mexico.

Associate Professor Christian Zlolniski (Anthropology), with scholars from El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF) in Tiajuana, Mexico, recently published De Jornaleros a Colonos: Residencia, Trabajo e Identidad en el Valle de San Quintin, or “From Migrant Farmworkers to Settlers: Residency, Work and Identity in the San Quintin Valley.” The Spanish-language monograph examines the living conditions of farmworkers in Valle de San Quintin, Baja California, an agricultural community located 90 miles south of San Diego, Calif.

Zlolniski, who collaborated with sociologist Laura Velasco and demographer Marie-Laure Coubés, said the book sheds light on how transnational agribusiness in Mexico are growing crops to meet demand in the U.S.

“This is a book about how the food that we consume in the U.S., especially fresh fruits and vegetables, affects the farm works growing those crops south of the border,” he said. “It is a study of the development of a region in northern Mexico and how the demands we have here in the U.S. shape the working conditions and the lives of the workers growing those fresh crops.”

Workers in the region earn an average of $10 per day and lack basic employee benefits like vacation days, overtime pay and healthcare. In March, 75,000 farmworkers joined a labor strike to call attention to the issues. Zlolniski said fewer labor and environmental regulations in Mexico enticed U.S. business to move production south of the border once the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was ratified in the 1990s. That move — coupled with agricultural innovations that allow common crops to be grown all year long — has had a lasting impact.

“Policymakers need to understand the intended and unintended consequences of conditions that arise for people who grow crops for export and not for themselves,” Zlolniski said. “It’s important to document that. This is the price for us to have access to these fresh crops all year-long.”

De Jornaleros a Colonos also examines the growth of a region of Mexico that has had rapid expansion as a direct result of the burgeoning agriculture industry. Many of the workers living in the area migrated from southern Mexico over the past three decades and, in Zlolniski’s view, have colonized the area.

“Despite the harsh life and low paying jobs, I was surprised by the energy and commitment of these farmworkers to adopt this new region as their home,” he said. “There was very little there before they moved in. So they are not only growing the foods we eat, but they’re building the place where they live from scratch.”

Zlolniski, who is also the director of the Center for Mexican American Studies, is working on an ethnographic study of the agricultural workers in the Baja California region and hopes to have a manuscript completed by next year. He and his colleagues also have published articles based on the research in De Jornaleros a Colonos in English- and Spanish-language academic journals.

“This book continues Dr. Zlolniski’s important research on those who are marginalized in the global economy,” said Associate Professor Robert Kunovich, chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. “This book sheds light on their plight and will encourage people to think about workers and communities around the world that have been placed in a similar situation.”

Zlolniski hopes his work will motivate students, scholars, government officials and the general public to reflect upon an issue that holds economic, social and humanitarian ramifications.

“Where previous discussions have been about where the merchandise and clothes we buy has been produced, now the discussion has moved to food,” he said. “What we provide in the book is the basis for understanding the conditions and why events like the labor strike took place. It is important for us on this side of the border to understand how the foods we expect are grown.”

Learn more about De Jornaleros a Colonos: Residencia, Trabajo e Identidad en el Valle de San Quintin at the COLEF website. Research for the monograph was supported by a grant from Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the National Science Foundation.

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(Story by James Dunning/COLA Communications, jdunning@uta.edu)

 

About the College of Liberal Arts
The College of Liberal Arts at UT Arlington serves more than 4,000 students enrolled in 26 undergraduate and 21 graduate programs. National accreditation includes the Department of Art & Art History through the National Association of Schools of Art & Design and the Department of Music through the National Association of Schools of Music. The College of Liberal Arts employs more than 300 faculty across 12 departments; faculty awards for research and creative activity include a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Pulitzer Prize nominations, a winner of La Cruz Andina de Oro [Andean Golden Cross] from the Bolivian Government, and multiple awards from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About UT Arlington
The University of Texas at Arlington is a comprehensive research institution of more than 50,000 students in campus-based and online degree programs and is the second largest institution in The University of Texas System. The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked UT Arlington as one of the 20 fastest-growing public research universities in the nation in 2014. U.S. News & World Report ranks UT Arlington fifth in the nation for undergraduate diversity. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as a “Best for Vets” college by Military Times magazine. Visit www.uta.edu to learn more, and find UT Arlington rankings and recognition at www.uta.edu/uta/about/rankings.php.

 

History Researcher Combs Cuba for Records

June 11, 2015
The Endangered Archives Programme endeavors to digitize deteriorating documents within communities across the globe. Assistant Professor David LaFevor is part of a team funded by the British Library to work in Latin and South America. View pictures of a recent trip and worship in São João do Carirí, Brazil. (Photo by David LaFevor)

The Endangered Archives Programme endeavors to digitize deteriorating documents within communities across the globe. Assistant Professor David LaFevor is part of a team funded by the British Library to work in Latin and South America. View pictures of a recent trip and workshop in São João do Carirí, Brazil. (Photo by David LaFevor)

A UT Arlington history researcher will spend part of his summer in Cuba, rummaging through dusty church vaults in search of records for millions of Africans forced into the Caribbean region more than 400 years ago.

Assistant Professor David LaFevor (History) is spending three weeks in Cuba and the surrounding area as part of a grant (up to 10,000 pounds or $15,500) from the British Library. He will identify, digitize and catalog documents as part of the Endangered Archives Programme, a project that includes graduate students and professors from universities across the globe.

“We know there are documents [in Cuba] kept by the Roman Catholic Church until 1898 — certificates of births, deaths and marriages and other important records for the roughly one million Africans imported into Cuba through the 16th and 19th centuries,” said LaFevor. “The ultimate purpose is to be able to trace not only the raw data and numbers of the slave trade, but also where different ethnicities of Africans ended up and how African cultures molded the evolution of Cuban identity over time.”

LaFevor said the first part of the project will include establishing relationships with local volunteers, educators and clergy as he visits churches in Trinidad, Bayamo, Santiago and Baracoa, creating inventories. While the Cuban government has done a “relatively good job” at keeping and preserving records of residents, he said, the Catholic Church records have been “largely untouched” and he is unsure of what he might find.

“It’s historically relevant because even the Cubans themselves have no idea how many pages of records still exist,” he said. “It could be millions or only a few hundreds.”

LaFevor has had experience in digitizing archival records. In 2005, as a graduate student at Vanderbilt University, he worked with historian Jane Landers on a similar project in Recife, Brazil, Cartagena, Colombia, and Quibdo, Colombia, one of the poorest Afro-Colombian communities. LaFevor said the region’s humidity and weather was challenging – moisture tends to irrevocably damage paper records over time – but the research experience fueled his passion and ability work in the field.

“When the department hired Dr. LaFevor in 2013 as a Latin American historian who could work on digital humanities projects such as this one, we hoped that he would expand our research and scholarship to this new and exciting field,” said Associate Professor W. Marvin Dulaney, chair of the Department of History. “He has more than lived up to our expectations and he has brought the department national as well as local recognition in his field of expertise.”

In Santiago, LaFevor will be joined by his brother Matt, a historical geographer at the University of Maryland. In late summer, he will join a team of researchers at Paraiba, Brazil, to photograph documents there as part of another British Library grant.

LaFevor said he is hopeful the success of his project in Santiago will lead to a 100,000-pound grant next year to expand his research into other Cuba communities like Bayamo and Havana. While there is always the chance these vaults may be empty or include unusable documents, LaFevor said it’s important to scour the archives and uncover the larger story of the slave population.

“Many of these areas have been hit with natural disasters like earthquakes and hurricanes over the past 40 years, so at some sites we may just hit a blank,” he said. “But if anything does exist that can tell a story of the millions of people imported over four centuries, then this is worth it.”

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(Story by James Dunning/COLA Communications, jdunning@uta.edu)

About the College of Liberal Arts
The College of Liberal Arts at UT Arlington serves more than 4,000 students enrolled in 26 undergraduate and 21 graduate programs. National accreditation includes the Department of Art & Art History through the National Association of Schools of Art & Design and the Department of Music through the National Association of Schools of Music. The College of Liberal Arts employs more than 300 faculty across 12 departments; faculty awards for research and creative activity include a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Pulitzer Prize nominations, a winner of La Cruz Andina de Oro [Andean Golden Cross] from the Bolivian Government, and multiple awards from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About UT Arlington
The University of Texas at Arlington is a comprehensive research institution of more than 50,000 students in campus-based and online degree programs and is the second largest institution in The University of Texas System. The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked UT Arlington as one of the 20 fastest-growing public research universities in the nation in 2014. U.S. News & World Report ranks UT Arlington fifth in the nation for undergraduate diversity. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as a “Best for Vets” college by Military Times magazine. Visit http://www.uta.edu to learn more, and find UT Arlington rankings and recognition at www.uta.edu/uta/about/rankings.php.

Pick a Winner off the COLA Summer Reading List

June 9, 2015

cola_summer_books

Summer time. Rising temps, road trips and (hopefully) a little peace and quiet. As we scramble to start our vacations and find a little relaxation, many of us long to turn off the TV set and pick up a book.

But what’s good? What’s worth reading? An informal poll of College of Liberal Arts faculty and staff – all avid readers, of course – brings you the following recommendations. For example, Professor and Department Chair Bruce Krajewski (English) says you can’t go wrong with a Sherlock Holmes tale by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, while Associate Professor Allan Saxe (Political Science) praises Samuel Huntington’s The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order, a look at foreign relations and international politics.

These fiction and nonfiction selections were made by faculty members Stacy Alaimo (English), Elisabeth Cawthon (History), Chis Conway (Modern Languages), Rebecca Deen (Political Science), Marvin Dulaney (History), Brent Sasley (Political Science) and Laurel Stvan (Linguistics & TESOL), as well as COLA staff members James Dunning and Ami Keller.

Enjoy!

FICTION

  • A Tale for the Time Being: A Novel by Ruth Ozeki
  • Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer
  • Arctic Chill by Arnaldur Indridason
  • Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
  • Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
  • Fortunata and Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós
  • Gone Girl: A Novel by Gillian Flynn
  • Night Film by Marisha Pessl
  • Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
  • Sweet by Tammara Webber
  • The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner
  • The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
  • The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  • The Moor’s Account by Laila Leilami
  • The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
  • The Paying Guest by Sarah Waters
  • The Scapegoat by Daphne du Maurier
  • The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud
  • Wild by Cheryl Strayed
  • Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel

NONFICTION

  • Babel No More: The Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Language Learners by Michael Erard
  • Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands: Dr. Lawrence A. Nixon and Black Activism by Will Guzman
  • Small town America: Finding Community, Shaping the Future by Robert Wuthnow
  • Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen
  • The Arab-Israeli Conflict in American Political Culture by Jonathan Rynhold
  • The Clash of Civilizations by Samuel Huntington
  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
  • The Unmaking of Israel by Gershom Gorenberg
  • Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Politics by Charles Krauthammer
  • What Should We Do with Our Brain by Catherine Malabou
  • Yes, Please by Amy Poehler

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UTA Marching Band Gets New Look      

June 5, 2015

musi_band_uniforms_sketchAt a national competition last fall, UT Arlington Marching Band Director Dr. John Zastoupil watched several thousand high school band students walk by, each dressed in crisp black-and-white uniforms.

Then he looked at the Mavericks marching band and saw the same thing. And that’s when a plan began to update the band’s performance uniforms.

“At the Band of America Super Regional Championships, we looked like everyone else,” Zastoupil said. “No one could really tell who we were. I knew we needed to update our look to better represent the University.”

So Zastoupil and his colleagues in the Department of Music submitted a proposal to replace the 13-year-old uniforms. In February, the University approved the purchase of 200 new uniforms – navy pants and white jackets with orange accents and the UTA Mavericks logo prominently displayed.

“These new uniforms look like UTA,” Zastoupil said. “When we go to shows in the fall, it will be obvious we are from UTA. Our current students are very excited. It’s a recruiting tool and it’s important the branding piece is in place.”

Recruiting for a marching band can be an exciting challenge when your university doesn’t have a football program, Zastoupil said. Some high school students want that game-day experience, performing each week in front of thousands of screaming fans while others enjoy the more competitive atmosphere. But the band’s competitive approach and quality routines cause many around the nation to take a second look at UTA, Zastoupil said.

“A lot of people around the country appreciate that we do this at a really high level,” he said. “We can do things that are a little more intricate and advanced than your average college band. We get to create our own opportunities through exhibitions and hosting events on campus.”

The new uniforms will debut Oct. 6 during Dean Corey Night, an Arlington ISD event, at Maverick Stadium. The UTA Marching Band will also host and participate in the Bands of America regional competition Oct. 10.

Professor and Department Chair Rick Bogard is confident the new look will turn heads.

“Aside from our athletic teams, our marching band may reach more of the public than any other element of the University,” Bogard said. “Marching band uniforms are constructed to last for years; our old ones have stood the test of time, but the time has come to retire them for a fresher, more contemporary look. We feel that the new uniforms will go far to spread the name of UTA and will enhance recruiting for the band and the University. We are most appreciative to the University for providing funds necessary to purchase the new uniforms.”

Zastoupil said the band’s final fall rehearsal on Oct. 22 at Maverick Stadium will be a special benefit show for parents, alumni and the greater Arlington community.

“Our 2015 show will celebrate the recent history of UTA marching band,” he said. “Our student leadership picked out the best music from three decades of shows. They came up with some cool musical and visual ideas to make this show something special.”

For more information on the UTA Marching Band, visit the group’s website.

 

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(Story by James Dunning/COLA Communications, jdunning@uta.edu)

 

About the College of Liberal Arts
The College of Liberal Arts at UT Arlington serves more than 4,000 students enrolled in 26 undergraduate and 21 graduate programs. National accreditation includes the Department of Art & Art History through the National Association of Schools of Art & Design and the Department of Music through the National Association of Schools of Music. The College of Liberal Arts employs more than 300 faculty across 12 departments; faculty awards for research and creative activity include a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Pulitzer Prize nominations, a winner of La Cruz Andina de Oro [Andean Golden Cross] from the Bolivian Government, and multiple awards from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About UT Arlington
The University of Texas at Arlington is a comprehensive research institution of more than 50,000 students in campus-based and online degree programs and is the second largest institution in The University of Texas System. The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked UT Arlington as one of the 20 fastest-growing public research universities in the nation in 2014. U.S. News & World Report ranks UT Arlington fifth in the nation for undergraduate diversity. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as a “Best for Vets” college by Military Times magazine. Visit www.uta.edu to learn more, and find UT Arlington rankings and recognition at www.uta.edu/uta/about/rankings.php.

 

 

 

 

A Cappella Choir Joins Rolling Stones for Concert

May 29, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington A Cappella Choir will experience life on the big stage when its members perform with the Rolling Stones during the rock band’s “Zip Code” concert June 6 at AT&T Stadium.

Agents for the legendary British band considered other excellent young adult chamber choirs in the region to accompany the Stones, but ultimately chose UT Arlington’s A Cappella Choir.

Over the past few decades, the choir has received many distinguished honors, appeared before the Texas Music Educators Convention, with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, at the national convention of the American Choral Directors Association and with the Manhattan Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. June 6 will mark the choir’s first time performing with rock royalty.

READ MORE at uta.edu/news.

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